Rejuvenation

Molecular Simulation Reveals A Possible Anti-Aging Target With Skin Rejuvenating Properties

Posted on 26 November 2020

Cells can respond to excessive damage by entering a state called senescence in which they are unable to divide, and are eventually removed by the immune system. Senescence is an important process as it prevents damaged cells from becoming cancerous. However, the accumulation of senescent cells during ageing is a problem, as they can promote the development of age-related diseases – including cancer!

One approach to tackle ageing could be to reverse cellular senescence. Research has shown that this can be done, but at the risk of triggering cancer and impairing tissue repair. Here, researchers identify a molecular target that could allow senescence to be safely reversed.

Simulations that model molecular interactions have identified an enzyme that could be targeted to reverse a natural aging process called cellular senescence. The findings were validated with laboratory experiments on skin cells and skin equivalent tissues, and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Professor Cho and his colleagues used an innovative strategy to identify molecules that could be targeted for reversing cellular senescence. The team pooled together information from the literature and databases about the molecular processes involved in cellular senescence. To this, they added results from their own research on the molecular processes involved in the proliferation, quiescence (a non-dividing cell that can re-enter the cell cycle) and senescence of skin fibroblasts, a cell type well known for repairing wounds. Using algorithms, they developed a model that simulates the interactions between these molecules. Their analyses allowed them to predict which molecules could be targeted to reverse cell senescence.

They then investigated one of the molecules, an enzyme called PDK1, in incubated senescent skin fibroblasts and three-dimensional skin equivalent tissue models. They found that blocking PDK1 led to the inhibition of two downstream signalling molecules, which in turn restored the cells’ ability to enter back into the cell cycle. Notably, the cells retained their capacity to regenerate wounded skin without proliferating in a way that could lead to malignant transformation.

The scientists recommend investigations are next done in organs and organisms to determine the full effect of PDK1 inhibition. Since the gene that codes for PDK1 is overexpressed in some cancers, the scientists expect that inhibiting it will have both anti-aging and anti-cancer effects.

Click here to view original web page at www.miragenews.com


Featured in This Post
Topics

Never Miss a Breakthrough!

Sign up for our newletter and get the latest breakthroughs direct to your inbox.

Checkout the Gowing Life Store

Scientifically Developed Blended Vitamins, and Exclusive Supplements For Health, and Longevity

Copyright © Gowing Life Limited, 2021 • All rights reserved • Registered in England & Wales No. 11774353 • Registered office: 14th Floor, St James Tower, 7 Charlotte Street, Manchester, United Kingdom, M1 4DZ.